Southern Upland Way Walking Holidays Bramble Cottage, Midtown, Dallry, Castle Douglas, Scotland, DG7 3UT, GB
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Accommodation and Services:
Location:

Pease Dean

Cockburnspath to
Cockburnspath

Walk No: 40

Start: Pease Bay. From the A1 roundabout just north of Cockburnspath, take the minor road signposted to Pease Bay. Follow the road along the cliff and down to the caravan park. Cross the ford and park on the right.

Finish: Pease Bay. From the A1 roundabout just north of Cockburnspath, take the minor road signposted to Pease Bay. Follow the road along the cliff and down to the caravan park. Cross the ford and park on the right.

Nearest Town: Cockburnspath



• Distance: 2 miles


• Height Gain:
•

• Relevant Map:
Difficulty: Moderate

• Terrain: Good paths. Can be muddy at times. Boots or strong shoes recommended.
• Toilets: At caravan park or in Cockburnspath.

• Refreshments: Shop at caravan park. Pub in Cockburnspath.

Route Description
Pease Dean is a Scottish Wildlife Trust reserve, purchased for its high conservation value as a surviving fragment of broadleaf forest. It consists of two deep valleys which join at their lower end. A network of paths has been laid out and there are information boards at several points. The Southern Upland Way passes through the Dean.

From the car park, cross the burn by the footbridge and turn left into the reserve. Follow the path up the right-hand valley, through which flows the Tower Burn. Trees in the reserve include ash, elm, oak and hazel with alders along the burns. The damp conditions are ideal for ferns.

Continue with the path until it crosses the burn, close to the railway line, and return down the other side of the burn. Keep right at a fork and then swing sharp right to walk up beside the Pease Burn to Pease Bridge, built in 1783 and at the time thought to be the highest stone bridge built in Europe.

Cross the bridge and turn left, back into the reserve, following Southern Upland Way signs down a long flight of steps. Continue with the Way right down to the edge of the reserve. Bird life includes woodpeckers, tree-creepers, dippers and various tits and finches. Roe deer and red squirrels are both present in the reserve. The return path leads directly back to the car park.